A New Museum

A New Museum
Introduction 20 February 2024, 10am

1/2

Manor, Bahnhofstrasse, 2010

Do we need new museums? Instead of conveying narratives of power and of how things have always been, new museums could be places of exchange, where the old and the new are present and where different voices are invited to contribute to continuing stories about art and society.

The Schweizerisches Sozialarchiv was established in 1906, and the breadth and diversity of its collections reflects something of the anti-authoritarian origins of Swiss society. The country’s position at the crossroads of Europe means that ‘being Swiss’ is always a dynamic and changing condition. Because it engages with every part of Swiss society the archive transcends many of the biases and power structures that lie at the core of more conventional museum collections.

This semester we will design a new kind of museum that brings material from the Sozialarchiv into direct contact with the people of Switzerland. At present, it is possible to visit the archive or access its collections online. We propose that a physical museum would be able to release the archive’s content and programmes out into the spaces of the city whose rich stories it tells. The museum could disrupt and rethink the relationship between institutions and their public, bringing ideas of the civic to street level which has been left to retail at the service of consumption for too long. A new open architecture could enable the museum to become a portal through which new stories told by the residents of the city can be collected, so that the archive and its public become even more engaged in ongoing cycles of discussion and social production.

Seth Siegelaub, Group Material, and Theaster Gates, collectors, curators and artists active from the 1960s to the present, have made collections and exhibitions that challenge content, display, and ideas of audience. Learning from both the intellectual and the spatial structures of their exhibitions – we will design ways to show and interpret specific parts of the Sozialarchiv collections. Attending to the exhibition architecture, the lighting and environmental conditions, the thresholds to the surrounding city, these designs will become the core ideas for new museums on three central sites in Zurich.

Introduction: 20 February 2024, 10:00 am, Entrance Landesmuseum, 8001 Zürich
Construction and writing as integrated disciplines are included in this course

FS 2024, ETH Zürich, Studio Caruso
Emilie Appercé, Lucia Bernini, Tibor Bielicky, Adam Caruso, Claudio Schneider

Diploma FS 2024

When content becomes form

1/2

A Clay Sermon, Theaster Gates, 2021

Museums have begun to acknowledge that they are not neutral and that their internal structures and displays reproduce power. They also recognise that they might possess too many objects and that their collections are often of questionable origin. We cannot simply shut museums down, because public institutions are the repositories of shared memories and ideas and are at the core of any idea of a sustainable society. If museums are in crisis, how can their relationships with the societies that they are a part of become more productive and what role can architecture play in this process. This semester we will speculate about new museums and the architecture that could support them. 

We will start by looking at small collections that comprise art, social documentation, and other archival material. With the help of people who run and use museums and with reference to contemporary discourses on institutional critique, we will engage with this material to find the stories and deeper relationships that exist between these artefacts and the societies from which they emerge, complex networks that are spatial as well as social. The research will be developed into ideas for the arrangement and the interpretation of collections in the production of catalogues and exhibitions, work that communicates the meanings and material qualities of these collections in vivid ways to more diverse audiences. 

The main design phase will expand these ideas so that the collections become a core around which other exhibitions, programmes, and ideas of the civic are developed into new ideas for the architecture of museums. Sited within disused industrial, retail and institutional spaces in Zurich it is intended that these experiments could find their way back through the doors of the city’s existing museums and archives.

Diploma, FS 2024, ETH Zürich
Chair Caruso
Emilie Appercé, Adam Caruso, Claudio Schneider
gta exhibitions
Fredi Fischli, Niels Olsen

Redesigning Museums

Redesigning Museums - Final Review
December 19 / 20, 2023

1/6

Museum Rietberg, Bosshard Blanca, Chiara Chan

Tuesday, December 19th and Wednesday, December 20th, Final Reviews

09:00, ETH Zürich, ONA E30

Guests: Debasish Borah, Ann Demeester, Gianni Jetzer, Solange Mbanefo, Joanna Mytkowska

Redesigning Museums - Studio Review 2
November 21 / 22, 2023

1/6

Löwenbräu Areal, Fabian Güzelgün, Ladina Naegeli, Che Facchin, Raphael Uhl, Jacqueline Coco, Meta Hunold

Tuesday, November 21st and Wednesday, November 22nd, Studio Review, ETH Zürich, ONA E30, 09:00 – 19:05

Guests: Thomas Demand, Angelika Hinterbrandner

Redesigning Museums - Studio Review 1
October 18, 2023

1/6

Museum Rietberg, Bosshard Blanca, Chiara Chan, Leander Aerni, Baldouin Bee, Simon Zimmermann, Maud Haas

Wednesday, October 18th, Studio Review, ETH Zürich, ONA E30, 09:30 – 17:00

Guest: Sabine von Fischer

Redesigning Museums
Introduction 19 September 2023, 9.30am

1/3

ruangrupa, Sarrum and Grafis Huru Hara, Gudskul, Documenta 15, Kassel

The last forty years have been a great success for museums and for museum architects. Never have so many of these institutions been constructed in so many different places. Their popularity reflects the global expansion of tourism and the pressure for cities and towns to develop their attractions. The financialization of art has meant that as collectors and their collections have immeasurably expanded, so too must the provision of museums.

Zurich has three significant examples of this phenomenon; Museum Rietberg (Grazioli and Krischanitz 2007), the Löwenbräu Areal (Gigon Guyer 2014) and the Kunsthaus (Chipperfield 2020) Each was expanded and restructured in response to specific conditions, yet all are part of this general global tendency. Whilst museum extensions are always sold as being about making more of the collection accessible to a wider public (and thanks to the support of generous benefactors), in the last decade the critique of these platitudes has intensified. The continued elitism of most cultural institutions, both in terms of their staff and their audiences, the racism and sexism inherent in their collections and institutional structures, and the nefarious origins of their collections, are now impossible to avoid and museums themselves have acknowledged that things must change.

So, what can we do about a problem like museums? We could just blow them up and start again, but that would not be very sustainable, and confronting historical problems is always more productive than erasing them. This semester we will redesign the museum, making projects that test the capacity of architecture to address historic bias in the content of museums, and social exclusion in their buildings. We will not embark on a search for the ideal museum but will rather closely engage with the trio of Zurich museums; talking to the people who run them, participating as visitors in their exhibitions and programmes. Guided by past and present disruptors in the art world, for example, the Guerrilla Girls (1985-), Group Material (1979-96), and ruangrupa (2000-) we will make concrete proposals to ‘hack’ both the organisation as well as the architecture of the museums. Our aim is to make projects where the museum and its collections more closely reflect and engage with the societies that they are a part of - with the community of Zurich in 2023.

Introduction: 19 September 2023, 9.30 am, location to be announced
The integrated discipline Construction is included in this course.

HS 2023, ETH Zürich, Studio Caruso
Emilie Appercé, Tibor Bielicky, Adam Caruso, Claudio Schneider, Barbara Thüler

Paris, le trottoir et la plage
Seminar Week: October 23–27, 2023

1/3

The Opera Garnier being restored. The capital invests in cleaning up its major monuments in preparation for the Olympics. January 2023

Expansive boulevards, formal gardens, infinite arcades, limestone facades and zinc roofs – the 19th century historic core of Paris appears immutable and more than a little hermetic. The grand cultural institutions embedded within the city – the Louvre, Palais Garnier, La Comédie Française, Musée du quai Branly – have an imperious presence consistent with their monumentality and an authority bestowed by the centralised structures of power. Beside this republican weight, the citizens of France are notoriously practiced revolutionaries, with a readiness to protest and set things alight. These are not merely the actions of the mob, but rather developed political mechanisms supported and theorised by diverse networks of public intellectuals.

We will visit Paris to engage with its great institutions at a time of institutional crisis brought on by the ever-increasing acknowledgement of how the inequities of empire are still rotting at the core of contemporary life. By interrogating the origins of collections and the stories they tell we will try to discern what can replace a discredited western canon. We will have this discussion with the members of those institutions and equally with cultural activists working at the periphery, the places where the stone runs out but where culture, learning and society can experiment with new forms. Our search will span from the 1st arrondissement to Pantin, where Emily in Paris meets la Haine.

The costs are 501–750 CHF including transportation within the city, one dinner, entrances and reader.
Category C, 16 students

HS 2023, ETH Zürich, Studio Caruso
Emilie Appercé, Tibor Bielicky, Adam Caruso, Claudio Schneider, Barbara Thüler

Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)

SHOULD WE CARE? (ABOUT) WALZMÜHLE
Martin  Roesch
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)

1/13

Silvie Frei / Aleksandra Skop
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)

1/8

Michael Asher

1/7
Edited by Paula Kiener, Samuel Giblin, Silvie Frei, Chloe Szwarc, Lukas Burger, Aleksandra Skop
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)PosterPDF  384 KB
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)
Poster
PDF  384 KB
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)Seminar WeekPDF  215 KB
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)
Seminar Week
PDF  215 KB
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)Reader StudioPDF  73 MB  (login required)
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)
Reader Studio
PDF  73 MB  (login required)
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)Reader Seminar WeekPDF  83 MB  (login required)
FS  2023  Re (Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat)
Reader Seminar Week
PDF  83 MB  (login required)

Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat

THE COPY WITHIN ITS FRAME
Ludwig Hänssler
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat

1/16

The office building at Gartenhofstrasse 17 was built in 1966 by Sigmund Feigel (1921 - 2004). While the adjacent Zweierstrasse is lined by a row of office buildings constructed around the same time, Gartenhofstrasse 17 is slightly set back into the street, reaching into the realm of residential buildings and neo-classicist factory buildings.

 


Throughout its lifespan the building had been renovated several times. The roof and the party walls on both sides have been isolated, the canopy renewed, and in 2011 the old facade panels were exchanged. The new facade, designed by Rolf Schaffner, led to a drastic decrease in energy consumption. The different construction periods result in a „bricolage des temps“.

 


Currently three of the building’s six stories are empty due to the relocation of municipal police offices, making the future of Gartenhofstrasse 17 uncertain.

 


Only few interventions are necessary to fundamentally change the organization of the building. 

On the inside a new form of living takes place where domestic spaces and the workplace fade into each other. From the outside the additions reinterpret the appearance of the building within its urban setting. While keeping the integrity of Schaffner´s facade intact, the side facades are opened with large pivoting windows that create a vis-à-vis to the adjacent neo-classicist buildings. In the courtyard one of the three parking garages has been opened, creating an alley way between the former office building and a new atelier building. On the front side an extension of the canopy allows a glimpse into the hidden world of the backyard. 

 


The ways in which particular elements, spaces and structures are transformed remind us of the „rococoization“ of gothic churches.  By introducing a new grammar, given things change the way we perceive them. Despite the obvious friction between building periodes and languages there derives a new unity.

Tiffanie Genilloud / Tim Stettler
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat

1/14

Louise Lawler

1/10
Edited by Tiffanie Genilloud, Tim Stettler, Adriano Cangemi, Ryutaro Matsushita, Robin Staubli, Airas Sánchez Keller

Download Book

HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, RepeatPosterPDF  735 KB
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat
Poster
PDF  735 KB
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, RepeatSeminar WeekPDF  339 KB
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat
Seminar Week
PDF  339 KB
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, RepeatReader StudioPDF  78 MB  (login required)
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat
Reader Studio
PDF  78 MB  (login required)
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, RepeatReader Seminar WeekPDF  53 MB  (login required)
HS  2022  Reframe, Rearrange, Repeat
Reader Seminar Week
PDF  53 MB  (login required)

Re form

Agora for Seebach
David Riedo
FS  2022  Re form

1/21

An Agora for Seebach - A new, „cultural and symbolic center“ for the neighborhood of Zurich Seebach. The architect of St. Mark‘s Church and later city architect of Zurich, Albert Heinrich Steiner, saw the situation on the Buhn-hill with the Buhnrain schoolhouse and St. Mark‘s Church as an optimal example of the center of a neighborhood. Unfortunately, not much of this can be seen today. the project is to change this! Although the buildings of St. Maark‘s Church and the Buhnrain Schoolhouse are almost built together, they do not have much in common. The project was to bring these two institutions together, one has too much - the other too little space, especially in view of the Mittagstisch 2025, where all schools in Zurich have to offer a day school structure with Lunch table for all students and for which the Buhnrain school building cannot offer any space.

Intervention points of the project - In order to connect the two institutions, more space is needed between them and a more direct connection between the school building and the community hall. The demolition of the no longer contemporary caretaker‘s apartment of the church creates a square between the buildings.

A new neighborhood square is created - The free square between the school and the church is to become a meeting place for the residents of the rapidly growing Seebach neighborhood. The population can meet there and linger in the various squares or gardens, an agora for Seebach.

New access and conversion of the room- The parish hall will get a new vestibule, oriented to the square. The caretaker‘s apartment of the school will be converted into a neighborhood space, as well as the arcade of the school will be extended and the volume broken through, connecting the two buildings more directly. Public toilets will be installed in the opening of the school.

A new axis connects the Church garden- A new path runs between the two buildings and connects the road leading up the hill, the „Höhenring“ with the upper neighborhood. The path is made of spolia of stones from the city of Zurich and stones from the quarry at the foot of the hill. This new axis at right angles to the large schoolhouse square connects the new neighborhood square with the church garden, which is currently little used and beautifully situated over Zurich Seebach / Oerlikon. The Landscape by landscape architect Gustav Ammann will be carefully extended. Outside, on a hilltop at the edge of the hill, a Monopteros, a viewing pavilion above the „Theater of the Goats“ is being built.

A shelter with multiple functions - The address from the north is formed by a paved square. This is followed by the new path with slight steps and a slight slope. A shelter with fine wooden supports follows this path and lends itself to various uses. Be it as a market stall for a neighborhood market or as a bicycle parking. The square is available for larger events such as a market or a neighborhood festival.

A garden pavilion as a focal point - The outdoor space design by Gustav Amman is carefully completed and meanders through the Gap, thus connecting the currently unused garden of the church with the new agora. The garden, in the most beautiful location above Seebach with a view of Oerlikon, is supplemented with an Odeon, a garden pavilion. This is available for smaller events. Together with the garden or the community hall, it can also be part of a larger event, for example, before a party in the hall, the aperitif can be drunk in the garden. The wooden pavilion with supports made of tree trunks fits perfectly in the context of the group of trees planted by Amman.

James Flaus / Luca Bronca
FS  2022  Re form

1/34

Bullingerkirche

1/11
Edited by Amélie Chiffelle, Céline Bourban, Marine Lachat, Julie Bovier, Xingyu He, Julius Schwartz
FS  2022  Re formPosterPDF  449 KB
FS  2022  Re form
Poster
PDF  449 KB
FS  2022  Re formSeminar WeekPDF  730 KB
FS  2022  Re form
Seminar Week
PDF  730 KB
FS  2022  Re formPosterPDF  724 KB
FS  2022  Re form
Poster
PDF  724 KB
FS  2022  Re formReader StudioPDF  16 MB  (login required)
FS  2022  Re form
Reader Studio
PDF  16 MB  (login required)
FS  2022  Re formReader Seminar WeekPDF  83 MB  (login required)
FS  2022  Re form
Reader Seminar Week
PDF  83 MB  (login required)

IEA Lecture

You cannot take risks without failing
March 15, 2022, 18:00

Adam Caruso
IEA Lecture Series FS 22
One Building, Failure Is an Option

ETH Zürich, ONA, Fokushalle

Watch the lecture online

Interim, forever

Städtische Tagträume
Carmino Weber
HS  2021  Interim, forever

1/20

In unmittelbarer Umgebung des Hotels Marriott entwichkeln sich in den 70er, 80er und 90er Jahren um und auf dem Platzspitz verschiedene Szenen. Züri brännt 1980. Das Marriott ist Teil des gescheiterten Infrastrukturprojekts Ypsilon und dem Milchbucktunnel. Welten treffen hier aufeinander, voneinander entkoppelt. Die Strategie des temporären Besetzens und Nutzens von Freiräumen in der Stadt wurde in der Jugendbewegung der 80er Jahren oft genutzt. Mit leichten Interventionen wird an unbeachteten Orten Unerwartetes geschaffen. Sie spielen sich in unterschiedlichen zeitlichen und räumlichen Grössenordnungen ab.

Juliet Ishak / Leonie Huber
HS  2021  Interim, forever

1/17

Projekt Interim Waldhaus

1/4
Edited by Karlo Keca, Florian K Jaritz, Leonie Huber, Juliet Ishak, Kelly Meng, Charlotte Pitteloud, Lancelot Burwell, Anastasia Zharova
HS  2021  Interim, foreverPosterPDF  636 KB
HS  2021  Interim, forever
Poster
PDF  636 KB
HS  2021  Interim, foreverSeminar WeekPDF  105 KB
HS  2021  Interim, forever
Seminar Week
PDF  105 KB
HS  2021  Interim, foreverReader StudioPDF  28 MB  (login required)
HS  2021  Interim, forever
Reader Studio
PDF  28 MB  (login required)

Women Writing Architecture

Website Launch
June 30, 2021

The website womenwritingarchitecture.org was launched this week on June 30th. The new resource, an annotated bibliography of writing by women about architecture, is now publicly accessible to discover, browse and contribute to.

Making Plans for Living Together

Talissa Weder
FS  2021  Making Plans for Living Together

1/41

As the city of Zürich is growing, the industrial and publicly not accessible areas, such as the site of the Engrosmarket, are moving closer to the city center. How do we, in future, deal with such areas which are ideally situated for their main function as a distribution center but at the same time within immediate proximity to residential quarters?

By implementing regulating elements such as doors, stairs, lights, the site is transformed into an environment where public events such as concerts, flee markets, food festivals can take place at certain times during the day and week. These performative elements refer to existing elements found on the site allowing the Engrosmakert to function as a highly specialised machine for distributing fresh goods. Through re-interpreting these elements in a new way and repeated implementation, the Engrosmarket is being transformed allowing public functions to take place at certain times and thus be integrated in the network of the city.

Sarah Köstler / Patrick Greber
FS  2021  Making Plans for Living Together, Zürich

1/33

Melliodora, Hepburn Permaculture Gardens

1/5
Edited by Murielle Morger, Eva Schneuwly, Jenna Nutivaara, Lisa Stricker
FS  2021  Making Plans for Living TogetherPosterPDF  323 KB
FS  2021  Making Plans for Living Together
Poster
PDF  323 KB
FS  2021  Making Plans for Living TogetherReader StudioPDF  16 MB  (login required)
FS  2021  Making Plans for Living Together
Reader Studio
PDF  16 MB  (login required)

Making Plans for Living

Xenia Strohmeyer
HS  2020  Making Plans for Living

1/15

Paul Grieguszies Schäfer / Jaehee Shin
HS  2020  Making Plans for Living, Zürich

1/16

Gawu, El Anatsui

1/8
Edited by David Eckert, Florian von Planta, Paul Grieguszies Schäfer, Jaehee Shin
HS  2020  Making Plans for LivingPosterPDF  1 MB
HS  2020  Making Plans for Living
Poster
PDF  1 MB
HS  2020  Making Plans for LivingSeminar WeekPDF  166 KB
HS  2020  Making Plans for Living
Seminar Week
PDF  166 KB
HS  2020  Making Plans for LivingReader StudioPDF  3 MB  (login required)
HS  2020  Making Plans for Living
Reader Studio
PDF  3 MB  (login required)
HS  2020  Making Plans for LivingReader Seminar WeekPDF  16 MB  (login required)
HS  2020  Making Plans for Living
Reader Seminar Week
PDF  16 MB  (login required)

Live: What is Next?

Seminar week 19–23 October 2020

A few semesters ago the studio tentatively made moves towards modernism. The evident failure of architecture to address the imbalance of contemporary life provided the motivation to look again at the more ideological and programmatic promises of modernism, particularly the second wave of the 60s and 70s, whose discourses were broadened to encompass themes of gender, the legacies of empire and the growing imbalances in our environment. The consumer driven economy and its insatiable consumption of precious resources is not sustainable, and the desires it claims to fill can never be satisfied. We need to shift our attention to things that give us purpose and happiness. What should we be doing, and how can we have fulfilling lives?

From our new home in Zürich Oerlikon we will meet and debate, both in person and on Zoom, a wide range of figures who are challenging the status quo of technique, economics and politics. We will both declare our existence to the wider world and also call for participation from beyond the limits of academia. The idea is that this intense week of research and outreach will supplement the ongoing themes of the studio, forming the basis of an interactive screen based journal and a special edition reader.

For the week we are collaborating with the Architecture Foundation, who is presenting and streaming the discussions throughout the week and who makes them accessible to rewatch on their YouTube channel

HS 2020, ETH Zürich, Studio Caruso

What is it worth?

Zelda Frank / Wiebke Gude
FS  2020  What is it worth?, Zürich

1/17

Download Book

Gordon Matta-Clark

1/9
Edited by Jessica Bützberger, Alessandra Ortelli, Maude Voutat

Download Booklet

Strips-paperPDF  158 MB
Strips-paper
PDF  158 MB
FS  2020  What is it worth?PosterPDF  118 KB
FS  2020  What is it worth?
Poster
PDF  118 KB
FS  2020  What is it worth?PosterPDF  373 KB
FS  2020  What is it worth?
Poster
PDF  373 KB
FS  2020  What is it worth?Seminar WeekPDF  247 KB
FS  2020  What is it worth?
Seminar Week
PDF  247 KB
FS  2020  What is it worth?Reader StudioPDF  4 MB  (login required)
FS  2020  What is it worth?
Reader Studio
PDF  4 MB  (login required)
FS  2020  What is it worth?Reader Seminar WeekPDF  4 MB  (login required)
FS  2020  What is it worth?
Reader Seminar Week
PDF  4 MB  (login required)

Society and the Image

Tanguy Caversaccio / Arnaud Pasche
HS  2019  Society and the Image, Zürich

1/12

August Sander

Edited by Vivienne Galliker, Aileen Geistlich, Jana von Wyl, Julia Werlen

Download Booklets

HS  2019  Society and the ImagePosterPDF  795 KB
HS  2019  Society and the Image
Poster
PDF  795 KB
HS  2019  Society and the ImageSeminar WeekPDF  716 KB
HS  2019  Society and the Image
Seminar Week
PDF  716 KB
FS  2019  Zurich ModernReader StudioPDF  317 KB  (login required)
FS  2019  Zurich Modern
Reader Studio
PDF  317 KB  (login required)
FS  2019  Zurich ModernReader SeminarweekPDF  10 MB  (login required)
FS  2019  Zurich Modern
Reader Seminarweek
PDF  10 MB  (login required)

Public Building

Sanjana Roy / Eric Bonhote
FS  2019  Public Building, Zürich

1/7

SESC Pompéia, Lina Bo Bardi
São Paulo, 1986

1/8
Edited by Kunqi Hou, Pan Hu, Xuehan Li, Ling Xu
FS  2019  Public BuildingPosterPDF  575 KB
FS  2019  Public Building
Poster
PDF  575 KB
FS  2019  Public BuildingSeminar WeekPDF  1 MB
FS  2019  Public Building
Seminar Week
PDF  1 MB
FS  2019  Public BuildingReader StudioPDF  596 KB  (login required)
FS  2019  Public Building
Reader Studio
PDF  596 KB  (login required)
FS  2019  Public BuildingReader SeminarweekPDF  44 MB  (login required)
FS  2019  Public Building
Reader Seminarweek
PDF  44 MB  (login required)
FS  2019  Public BuildingWorkbook ReferencesPDF  201 MB  (login required)
FS  2019  Public Building
Workbook References
PDF  201 MB  (login required)

Hidden Interiors

Tobias Wagner
HS  2018  Hidden Interiors, Zürich

1/7

Das Wohnzimmer, Heinrich Tessenow
1908

1/7
Edited by Carola Hartmann, Laura Ferreira Dos Santos, Patricia Bachmann, Sara Finzi-Longo
HS  2018  Hidden InteriorsSeminar WeekPDF  617 KB
HS  2018  Hidden Interiors
Seminar Week
PDF  617 KB
HS  2018  Hidden InteriorsPosterPDF  479 KB
HS  2018  Hidden Interiors
Poster
PDF  479 KB
HS  2018  Hidden InteriorsReader StudioPDF  32 MB  (login required)
HS  2018  Hidden Interiors
Reader Studio
PDF  32 MB  (login required)
HS  2018  Hidden InteriorsReader SeminarweekPDF  17 MB  (login required)
HS  2018  Hidden Interiors
Reader Seminarweek
PDF  17 MB  (login required)
HS  2018  Hidden InteriorsWorkbook ReferencesPDF  304 MB  (login required)
HS  2018  Hidden Interiors
Workbook References
PDF  304 MB  (login required)

The Ideal City

Luka Lijovic / Graziella Gini
FS  2018  The Ideal City, Spreitenbach

1/6

Renaissance City, Piero della Francesca
Urbino, 1480

1/5
Edited by Silouane Fellrath, Gaetan Iannone, Heidi Silvennoinen, Jonas Sundberg
FS  2018  The Ideal CityWorkbook ReferencesPDF  321 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal City
Workbook References
PDF  321 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal CityWorkbookPDF  431 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal City
Workbook
PDF  431 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal CityReader StudioPDF  31 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal City
Reader Studio
PDF  31 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal CityReader SeminarweekPDF  85 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal City
Reader Seminarweek
PDF  85 MB  (login required)
FS  2018  The Ideal CityPoster StudioPDF  358 KB
FS  2018  The Ideal City
Poster Studio
PDF  358 KB
FS  2018  The Ideal CityPoster SeminarweekPDF  589 KB
FS  2018  The Ideal City
Poster Seminarweek
PDF  589 KB

Describing Beauty

Michael Prager
HS  2017  Describing Beauty, Zürich

1/12

Untitled (Roma), Cy Twombly
1959

1/16
Edited by Lisa Neuenschwander, Ina Stammberger
HS  2017  Describing BeautyWorkbook ReferencesPDF  244 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing Beauty
Workbook References
PDF  244 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing BeautyWorkbookPDF  324 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing Beauty
Workbook
PDF  324 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing BeautyReader StudioPDF  11 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing Beauty
Reader Studio
PDF  11 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing BeautyReader SeminarweekPDF  29 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing Beauty
Reader Seminarweek
PDF  29 MB  (login required)
HS  2017  Describing BeautyPoster SeminarweekPDF  430 KB
HS  2017  Describing Beauty
Poster Seminarweek
PDF  430 KB
HS  2017  Describing BeautyPoster StudioPDF  2 MB
HS  2017  Describing Beauty
Poster Studio
PDF  2 MB

Structure and Society

Chao Wu / Reto Streit
FS  2017  Structure and Society, Zürich

1/9

Palace of Culture
Warschau, 1955

1/5
Edited by Annika Bühler, Alcide Bähler, Caroline Lütjens, Joël Schärer
FS  2017  Structure and SocietyWorkbookPDF  357 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and Society
Workbook
PDF  357 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and SocietyWorkbook ReferencesPDF  94 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and Society
Workbook References
PDF  94 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and SocietyReader StudioPDF  23 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and Society
Reader Studio
PDF  23 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and SocietyReader SeminarweekPDF  29 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and Society
Reader Seminarweek
PDF  29 MB  (login required)
FS  2017  Structure and SocietyPoster SeminarweekPDF  1 MB
FS  2017  Structure and Society
Poster Seminarweek
PDF  1 MB
FS  2017  Structure and SocietyPoster StudioPDF  906 KB
FS  2017  Structure and Society
Poster Studio
PDF  906 KB

Social Structure

Valentina Sieber / Geraldine Burger
HS  2016  Social Structure, Graubünden

1/17

Infrastructure & Tourism
Graubünden

1/15
Edited by Allegra Stucki, Enrico Pegolo, Julia Oehler, Lenz Schnell, Luca Branger, Nils Franzini, Tim Simonet, Tobias Gagliardi
HS  2016  Social StructureWorkbookPDF  284 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Workbook
PDF  284 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureWorkbook ResearchPDF  491 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Workbook Research
PDF  491 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureWorkbook ResearchPDF  356 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Workbook Research
PDF  356 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureWorkbook ResearchPDF  574 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Workbook Research
PDF  574 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureWorkbook ResearchPDF  323 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Workbook Research
PDF  323 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureWorkbook ResearchPDF  266 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Workbook Research
PDF  266 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureWorkbook ResearchPDF  152 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Workbook Research
PDF  152 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureReader StudioPDF  5 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Reader Studio
PDF  5 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructureReader SeminarweekPDF  24 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social Structure
Reader Seminarweek
PDF  24 MB  (login required)
HS  2016  Social StructurePoster SeminarweekPDF  301 KB
HS  2016  Social Structure
Poster Seminarweek
PDF  301 KB
HS  2016  Social StructurePoster StudioPDF  1 MB
HS  2016  Social Structure
Poster Studio
PDF  1 MB